Using Ice Resin

20 Feb

Guest Blog Post by Design Team member Terri Ayers

Comments in italics by Deb

 

Ice Resin®, according to their website,  “is a Jeweler’s Grade, naturally doming, self-leveling & healing, crystal clear resin. ICE Resin® is a 2-part epoxy resin: Part A is the Resin. It has a slightly blue tint. Part B is the hardener. It has a very slight yellow tint. Part A and Part B must be poured with a one-to-one ratio and mixed gently but thoroughly for ICE Resin® to dry and cure properly. You may wear your jewelry as soon as ICE Resin® is dry to the touch.”

resin

I have been curious to try this product and was delighted to find it in my monthly mystery package to try out from Blue Twig Studio.

 

ICE Resin® was designed by a jeweler, so it’s primary use is for creating jewelry, but there are many other things that it can be used for. It can by used to paint over paper or tissue paper to give it gloss and strength.  Butterfly or angel wings could be fun to try this with.  There are special molds that the resin can be pored into and little trinkets, found objects and embellishments can be layered into the resin. (there are also new color tints for the resin, so you can add a layer of colored resin if you want)

resin 4

I first did a trial of the product in a few bottle caps.  The first one I glued a piece of scrapbook paper into the bottle cap and then poured in a bit of resin.  The paper was a bit thin and I think the gray inside the cap showed through.  The next cap I filled halfway with resin and poured in some Ranger Distress Glitter Dust (that sounds fun).  It sort of sank in and a smooth sparkly top was the result.

resin 2

I kept the main project simple.  I used an alcohol ink paper sample that I had made in one of Blue Twig’s classes and cut it with a 1” circle punch.  I glued it into a jewelry pendant bezel with matte medium and let it dry.  I took a risk and did not use any fixative over my ink project and it was ok.  The resin didn’t interfere with marring or blurring the image.  I mixed the two parts of the resin together and let it rest 5 minutes and dripped it into the bezel letting it dome over.  There were more bubbles initially and most of them disappeared, but a few remained.  Slower mixing or research to reduce air bubbles may yield perfect results.  I don’t mind the bubbles!

resin 3

I had a few words stamped on a piece of tissue paper and I painted the mixed leftover resin on both sides of the tissue.  It dried and I cut them out.  They could be fun with a mini-eyelet and used to add to jewelry or embellish artwork. (you can use the leftover resin on any painted papers – perfect for gelli prints – and create a nice heavy paper that you can then use with punches or a die cut and create a variety of shapes)

 

Final notes.  1.  Take care with ventilation, the product has some fumes and is a bit smelly.  2. Slowly mix Part A & B of the resin components to avoid excess air bubbles.  I had fun with this and already have a request for a purple alcohol ink and resin pendant.

~Terri

Thanks for a great review Terri. I’ve only done a couple things with the Ice Resin, but I found it easy to work with. And now I am inspired to go work with it again. 

~Deb

Let Your Inner Artist out to Play

Blue Twig Studio

5039 N Academy Blvd

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

719-266-1866

 

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One Response to “Using Ice Resin”

  1. claywithme March 26, 2016 at 3:07 pm #

    Reblogged this on claywithmestudio.

    Like

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