Tea lights and a Postcard

3 Nov

 Guest Blog Post by Lynnita Knoch – design team member

 Italics comments posted from Deb

 

My name is Lynnita Knoch, a member of Deb Prewitt’s Design Team for her shop, Blue Twig Studio.  I feel very honored that Deb chose me. (I am happy to have you here and I look forward to seeing what you create.)

 

For the month of November, I tested a few products and used them in two projects (a postcard and tealight holders) that will be displayed at Blue Twig Studio.  I started with quick, easy projects, so these could be done for the upcoming holidays – a handmade postcard you could send someone special or tealight holders for gifts or to decorate your home.

 

The products I’m specifically testing and reviewing this month are:

  1. Tim Holtz’s Distress Paint in brushed pewter  and victorian velvet (pink).  These are acrylic paints dabbers for multiple surfaces.
  2. Viva Croco Crackling Color in blackberry (purple color) Viva Croco comes in a wide selection of colors.

    Viva Croco Crackling Color

    Viva Croco Crackling Color

  3. a Mini Navaho, 6×6 Stencil by The Crafters Workshop.com, Designs by Jaime

    Navajo stencil

    Navajo stencil

A couple other products I used to help create the projects were:

  1. Dylusions Ink Spray in bubblegum pink

    Dylusions spray/Martha Stewart glass paint

    Dylusions spray/Martha Stewart glass paint

  2. Martha Stewart Crafts: Fine Glitter Translucent Glass Paint in antique silver (gold color) (Sorry, Blue Twig Studio doesn’t carry this product at this time.)

The postcard is Strathmore 140 lb 4″ x 6″ acid-free, cold-pressed watercolor paper. I coated the postcard with the brushed pewter distress paint, leaving a shiny gray surface.

Postcard with pewter paint

Postcard with pewter paint

I added the victorian velvet (pink) paint through the stencil, but it didn’t work as well as I hoped.

Adding paint through the stencil

Adding paint through the stencil

The paint bled under the stencil, leaving a fuzzy pattern. I ended up smearing the paint over the entire postcard, so the postcard has a mottled background of pewter and pink. (sometimes you have to just go with the flow when you are creating)

Layers of pewter and pink paints

Layers of pewter and pink paints

I decided to try the glittery translucent paint that I have in antique silver with the stencil.

Glittery paint through stencil

Glittery paint through stencil

Some of the stencil pattern isn’t well-defined, but I like the texture and color it adds to the matte effect of the distress paints. I like bright colors, so I sprayed Dylusions Ink Spray in bubblegum pink through the stencil over one corner of the postcard.

Dylusions sprays through the stencil

Dylusions sprays through the stencil

To see how the cracking colour works on paper,  I added it to just a few of the stenciled areas for more interest, texture, and value.

Crackling color added

Crackling color added

After the crackling colour dried for 24 hours, I zentangled the word JOY using black Sakura micron pens in sizes 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05. (I love the micron pens and I have many sizes in the shop.)

Added JOY with microns

Added JOY with microns

For further embellishment, I added a large opalescent sequin and a pink fabric flower over it the “O”. (You could use almost anything to embellish your postcard – buttons, flowers, gears, sequins, charms, etc.)

Postcard front

Postcard front

 

The back of the postcard looked naked being bare of any paint or designs. I painted the back of the postcard with the distress paint dabbers, again creating a mottled pewter and victorian velvet (pink) background.   I added these quotes about JOY to the back once the paint was dry.

Postcard back

Postcard back

  • “Choose JOY” – Sara Frankl
  • “JOY, being happy, is a choice that you make every day.” – Dawn Camp
  • “I will take Joy in the God of my salvation.” – Habakkuk 3:18

I addressed it to myself for Deb to mail to me when she is done with the sample.

 

Second Project: Tealight Holders

I also made tealight holders with the crackling color. I started with a pair of 2″ square glass holders.

2" glass tealight holders

2″ glass tealight holders

Initially I painted them with the Martha Stewart Translucent Glittery Glass Paint in antique silver, which actually was more gold in color.

layer of glitter paint

layer of glitter paint

After that dried, I painted them with the blackberry crackling color.

adding croco color

adding croco color

It needed to cure for 24 hours, although the crackle started to appear after a few hours. (sometimes it is really hard to wait for stuff to dry)

after the croco has dried for 24 hrs

after the croco has dried for 24 hrs

The tealight holders would look fine this way, but I decided to embellish them with a ribbon (you know there is lots of ribbon at Blue Twig Studio), a couple of leaf-shaped sequins, and a circular gold crystal, which I hot-glued to the tealight holders. They look beautiful with the tealights glowing through the crackling color.

Golden glow of candlelight through the crackling colors

Golden glow of candlelight through the crackling colors

 

 

These tealight holders will make nice, inexpensive gifts for the upcoming holidays or can be used to decorate your home. I love the soft, golden glow showing the crackling effect.

 

Notes about the products:

Tim Holtz’s sponge dabbers were easy to use the first time I opened them. The paint rolled smoothly over the surface of a watercolor paper postcard.  However, there were a couple days between using the Tim Holtz’s Distress Paint dabbers on the front of the postcard and the back of the postcard. I had no problems with the victorian velvet color, but the brushed pewter dabber would not allow paint to flow onto the dabber sponge. I found the ball for mixing the metallic paint was stuck in the opening where the paint flows. However, even after removing it, I still could not get paint to flow onto the dabber sponge. I ended up using removing the dabber sponge cap and dipping a paint brush into the bottle of paint and knocking it over in the process. Thankfully, I was able to save most of the paint. The bottles do say to store them upside-down, which I did. I would advise if the dabber will not work, to pour a couple drops of paint into a palette and close the bottle.  (Do NOT work with an open bottle of paint! lol!)

The directions for the crackling colour say to use a thicker layer to get the best crackling effect, with 1-4 mm being the optimum range of thickness.  The crackling on the postcard and the glass tealight holders came out best where I layered the colour closer to 1mm than the 4mm of thickness. The thicker layers on the glass did not crackle as well. On the other hand, too thin a layer does not crackle at all  – this happened on one place on the postcard, where I got the layer too thin. (Like most things, it probably takes a little practice to get it just right)

 

Other thoughts:

I had never used the Viva Croco Crackling Colour before, although I have used Tim Holtz’s Distress Paint previously. The victorian velvet and brushing pewter created a challenge, as these are not colors I normally use. But I had fun creating the postcard. I plan to create more postcards to send to family for the upcoming holidays. I love the tealight holders, but  I enjoy lighting candles especially when we have guests. I will be making more sets of these to give to my daughter and daughters-in-law for Christmas.

 

I hope you enjoyed the review and projects. Try these products, if you haven’t already. Experiment and have fun!

 

Keep creating!!

~Lynnita

 

 Thanks so much to Lynnita for this blog post. I hope you can use these ideas to create your own projects. 

~Deb

Let Your Inner Artist Out To Play

Blue Twig Studio – 5039 N Academy Blvd – Colorado Springs, CO 80918

719-266-1866

 

Tim Holtz Distress Paints

Viva Croco Colors

Navajo Stencil

All Stencils

Dylusions Sprays

Blue Twig Studio

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8 Responses to “Tea lights and a Postcard”

  1. Sonja Milojevic November 4, 2014 at 4:57 am #

    The card and the candle holders are lovely! Great work Lynnita!

    Like

  2. kristin November 4, 2014 at 5:30 am #

    loved the tea lights- great idea for a small gift! and really liked hearing the product review!!

    Like

    • Deb Prewitt November 4, 2014 at 7:35 am #

      It is those little bits of information that help us decide what we want to do.

      Like

  3. joyofartstudio November 5, 2014 at 8:14 am #

    I also enjoyed your product tutorial and am eager to try it especially tea lights and the layering on glass sounds yummy. and a perfect project for my Girls Night Out Arts and Crafts and with the holidays coming up perfect. Your step process was very easy to follow and clear. I can tell that you are knowledgeable in teaching others. It has also helped me put a format together in how I am doing my own tutorial. Even though I do enjoy creating tutorial videos I think this may be the way I go instead. Wonderful work Lynnita You have also inspired me in my projects. As a part of the design team I look forward to sharing more during the time that we are working together.Joy

    Like

    • lynnk50 November 6, 2014 at 9:20 am #

      Thank you, Joy. Have fun making the tealights with your Girls Night Out group. I’m excited about being part of the design team, as well, and sharing and learning from each other. Lynnita

      Like

      • joyofartstudio November 16, 2014 at 1:00 pm #

        Hello Lynn thanks for visiting my blog and so glad we are connected in this project on Blue Twig Studio looking forward to seeing what else you do… Joy

        Like

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